Help and Support across Yorkshire and the Humber

9am-5pm Mon-Fri Call: 0808 2800 999

24 Hour National Helpline: 0808 2000 247

Our Services

A range of gender-sensitive Domestic Abuse community services are currently provided by Staying Put.

Helpline

The Staying Put helpline is open 9am–5pm on weekdays. Our dedicated telephone support experts offer support and provide victims with options to enable them to make informed choices. Our team offers listening support, information, advice/signposting and initial risk assessments.

9am-5pm Mon-Fri Call: 0808 2800 999

Out-of-hours response:

Project Kyleford is an out-of-office service from Friday to Sunday between 5pm and midnight. We work in partnership with West Yorkshire Police to respond to domestic abuse incidents.

24 Hour National Helpline: 0808 2000 247

Our support team may then refer in-house to services below depending on your need:

 

We can help you in the following ways:

  • Support you to explore your options  
  • Provide emotional  support - short and long term
  • Securing your home - Lock changes/panic alarms
  • Assist with referrals to emergency/refuge accommodation, with benefits and housing support 
  • Counselling referrals 
  • Assist in civil and criminal law options 
  • Arrange and accompany you to solicitor appointments and to court
  • Clarify bail conditions
  • Provide support to attend court for Child Residency, Prohibited Steps Orders and CAFCASS hearings
  • Provide ‘Self Rep’ packs for DIY Injunctions
  • Develop links with legal professionals
  • Provide ongoing information regarding case progression with victim support, solicitors, court security, police, probation

What is Domestic Abuse?

"Any violent or abusive pattern of behaviour (whether physical, sexual, psychological, emotional, verbal, financial, coercive control) which is used by one person to control and dominate another with whom they have, or have had, a personal or family relationship."

Domestic Abuse is defined as: any incident of threatening behaviour, violence or abuse (psychological, coercive, physical, sexual, financial or emotional) between adults who are, or have been, intimate partners or family members, regardless of gender or sexuality.

Domestic Abuse is rarely a one-off incident and should be seen as a pattern of abusive and controlling behaviour through which the abuser seeks power over their victim. It occurs across the whole of society, regardless of age, gender, race, sexuality, disability, religion, class, or lifestyle and income. Research and government policy recognise that domestic violence is gendered; that is, most perpetrators are male and most victims are female.  As well, the gender of both victim and perpetrator influences behaviour and the severity of risk and harm caused. 

The Government definition of domestic violence:

Any incident of threatening behaviour, violence or abuse (psychological, physical, sexual, financial or emotional) between adults who are or have been intimate partners or family members, regardless of gender or sexuality." This includes issues of concern to black and minority ethnic (BME) communities such as so called 'honour based violence', female genital mutilation (FGM) and forced marriage.

Further, the Home Office has been proactive in supporting victims of forced marriages often committed in the name of ‘honour’, forced marriage and female genital mutilation are also considered acts of domestic abuse (Home Office, 2007, Domestic Violence: An MP’s Guide).

Domestic Abuse is under-reported. It is estimated that only 40% of domestic abuse is reported to the police